Skip to main content

Toast to MethaneSAT: Tackling Methane Emissions from Orbit

Join us for a historic moment as we celebrate MethaneSAT, a groundbreaking satellite that will track methane emissions on a global scale. Food and beverages will be served as we toast to MethaneSAT’s upcoming launch.

MethaneSAT is the result of a collaborative effort between the Environmental Defense Fund, space technology experts, and faculty and researchers at the Harvard Paulson School of Engineering & Applied Sciences and the Harvard & Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The cutting-edge satellite will play a pivotal role in addressing one of the most pressing climate change challenges of our time – methane emissions. For the first time, MethaneSAT will provide corporations and governments around the world with both granular and global data on methane leaks.

All members of the Harvard community are welcome to join! Registration required.

Religion in Times of Earth Crisis: The Practice of Wild Mercy: Something Deeper Than Hope

Zoom

Can personhood be granted to mountains, lakes, and rivers? What does it mean to be met by another species? How do we extend our notion of power to include all life forms? And what does a different kind of power look like and feel like? Wild Mercy is in our hands. Practices of attention in the field with compassion and grace deepen our kinship with life, allowing us to touch something deeper than hope. Great Salt Lake offers us a reflection into our own nature: Are we shrinking or expanding?

Speaker: Terry Tempest Williams, HDS Writer-in-Residence
Moderator: Diane L. Moore, Diane L. Moore, Associate Dean of Religion and Public Life

Landscape Sketching

Landscapes are an appealing subject for drawings, but it can be difficult to know where to start. In this program we will learn how to select a landscape, create a sense of depth and volume, and use a variety of marks to capture a dynamic variety of textures.

Landscape Sketching

Zoom

Landscapes are an appealing subject for drawings, but it can be difficult to know where to start. In this program we will learn how to select a landscape, create a sense of depth and volume, and use a variety of marks to capture a dynamic variety of textures.

Religion in Times of Earth Crisis: Reflecting on Religion in Times of Earth Crisis

Zoom

This session will be a discussion among presenters reflecting upon the insights shared throughout the series. In addition to identifying themes and throughlines among sessions, we will return to the overarching questions that framed this collaboration: What can an expansive understanding of religion provide in these times of Earth crisis? What is the role of the study of religion in times of catastrophe?

Panelists: Mayra Rivera, Dan McKanan, Teren Sevea, Matthew Ichihashi Potts, Terry Tempest Williams
Moderator: Diane L. Moore, Diane L. Moore, Associate Dean of Religion and Public Life

The Greener Gender: Women Politicians and Deforestation in Brazil

CGIS South, S216 +1 more

This paper examines the impact of women’s political representation on deforestation rates in Brazil. Using close election regression discontinuity design, we show that women, when elected to office, are more likely to drive improved environmental outcomes due to factors such as reduced access to corrupt networks that influence the enforcement of environmental laws at the local level. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that women’s political representation significantly reduces deforestation rates in the Brazil.

The Environment Forum with Hiʻilei Hobart | What Returns, What Remains: A Story about Hawaiian Landscape and Dis/Possession

Emerson Hall, Room 105

In February 2020, a group of Kanaka ‘Ōiwi cultural practitioners arrived in Cambridge, England, to repatriate ancestral remains stolen from Hawaiʻi in the late nineteenth century. This article explores the possession, return, and interpretation of these remains, specifically 14 iwi poʻo (human skulls) originating from the Pali, an important historic battle site in the Koʻolau mountain range of Oʻahu. In telling the story of their possession and dispossession, I draw upon theories of haunting from Indigenous studies and Black studies in order to challenge the way that settler colonial structures work to limit and potentially foreclose Hawaiian relationships to spiritual presence and placemaking. Drawing upon the Native Hawaiian concept of hoʻopahulu, which encompasses both spectrality and the exhaustion of land from over-farming in ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi (Hawaiian language), this article highlights connections between land, spirit, and haunting that provide a more comprehensive framework for understanding spectral placemaking beyond colonial geographies. In doing so, I argue against possessive logics, showing how contemporary Hawaiian cultural geogrpahies fundamentally refuse, upend, and replant relations that exceed the American state.

This event is co-sponsored by the Salata Institute for Climate and Sustainability

For full details, visit: https://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/event/environment-forum-hi%E2%80%99ilei-hobart-what-returns-what-remains-story-about-hawaiian

Freecycle | April 2024

Smith Campus Center

Come Freecycle with us!  This popular recurring reuse event, the Freecycle, is like a yard sale where everything is free. The Freecycle promotes reuse by giving you a chance to: Donate items you no longer need and pass them along to someone who has a use for them And/or pick up something new-to-you that you could […]

Event Series Green Team Meetings

HGSE Green Team Meeting

Eliot Lyman Room in Longfellow Hall Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

All HGSE students, faculty, and staff interested in making our school healthier and more sustainable are encouraged to join the HGSE Green Team!

Earth Day Celebration on Science Center Plaza

The Science Center Plaza 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge, United States

Join the Harvard Office for Sustainability for an Earth Day Event on Thursday, April 18 from 12 to 2pm on the Science Center Plaza. Learn from and connect with Harvard groups tabling at the event.